Physical Therapy Team

The central focus of our work is developing the child’s ability to move so that he or she can attain independence and participate as fully as possible in everyday life. Mastering new motor skills is facilitated by implementing and practicing them throughout the day, both in the preschool and at home.

This is why the partnership between the parents and the classroom staff and physical therapist is so important in maximizing the motor potential of each child, with the goal of enabling their full participation in their surroundings.

The team includes eight physical therapists and two volunteers who care for all the children in the preschool with cerebral palsy, as well as those with motor coordination impairment. We provide individual and group treatment, as well as joint sessions with the occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, and movement therapists. The treatment takes place in the classrooms, in the physiotherapy rooms and throughout the indoor and outdoor spaces in the preschool such as the hallways and the playground.

Equipment and auxiliary aids
Each child in the preschool is provided with equipment suitable to his or her needs – a chair, a stander, a dynamic stander, a walker, leg orthoses and more. We make sure the required equipment and auxiliary aids suit each child for use both at school and at home.

Sports room
This is a major attraction, especially for older children, who walk on a motorized treadmill, climb ladders and “work out” using equipment appropriate for their special needs.

Bike riding program
Groups of children ride bicycles suited to their individual needs: bikes with or without training wheels, tricycles or stationary bikes. This effective and empowering tool builds strength while providing the children with enjoyment and mobility.

Supports
Leah Kafri, a member of the physical therapy team, specializes in the field of foot and leg orthoses. With the assistance of the child’s personal physical therapist, she both advises on and implements the fitting of orthoses for those who can benefit from their use, whether the children are walking independently, walking with the help of mobility aids, or need the orthoses in order to stand.

Orthopedic clinics
Dr. Lionel Copeliovich, the head of the Pediatric Orthopedics Department at Assaf Harofeh Hospital in central Israel, holds clinical consultations with parents and the Israel Elwyn physical therapy team for orthopedic follow up and for making joint decisions about various interventions such as Botox injections, surgical procedures and orthoses.

Home visits
Members of the physiotherapy team go to the children’s homes to familiarize themselves with the child’s surroundings and to help arrange the home to best suit the child’s needs and improve his or her level of functioning.